Why I Let My Emotions Get the Best of Me

Big girls do cry…

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Image by Gino Crescoli from Pixabay

When you see someone crying, does it make you uncomfortable? Do you feel like they should get a handle on themselves? Suck it up and stop crying? Well, you certainly wouldn’t be the only one.

Our society is one that doesn’t take too kindly to shows of emotion, especially the sloppy crying kind. We call these people “crybabies” or even worse, “unstable.”

But does wearing our emotions on our sleeves mean we’re weak? That we can’t handle the things life throws at us? I, a frequent crier and emotional woman, beg to differ.

I’ve always been a crier. Whenever something bad happens, or even something really good, my body’s first reaction is to cry. Some may say hormones are to blame, and sure, they may play a part, but I think this is just how I’m wired.

I am an emotional woman. I fit all of the stereotypes. I cry when I’m stressed, frustrated, upset, mad, etc. I cry at movies, books, even songs — all can bring tears to my eyes. Basically anytime my emotions spike, in either direction, I cry.

But just because I cry a lot, does that mean I cry too much?

I don’t think so. I don’t cry every day. I am not depressed all the time. I am just sensitive and emotional. And I don’t think that’s a bad thing. In fact, it may actually be a benefit.

Feelings Aren’t Scary

I’m not saying we all need to have intimate Bachelor-style conversations all the time where we express how much we feel for one another. We don’t need to be talking about our feelings all the time. But ignoring them and pushing them out doesn’t solve anything.

We should be embracing our feelings and emotions. Letting them show us what we truly care about.

And not to get too hippy dippy, but our emotions can help us get in better touch with who we are.

Emotions don’t lie. Sometimes, when I’m crying about something, it may seem like something silly on the surface, like a comment my husband made about my hair (true story). But the fact that I cry about it usually means there’s something else underneath that’s bothering me. Like stress about work or missing my family.

The tears can help reveal a truth. Even if it’s something I can’t admit, even to myself, when the tears come, I can see the truth.

Crying is a Relief

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Image by Ben Kerckx from Pixabay

Sometimes a good cry is just what I need. I tend to let stress and anxiety get to me a lot, and when that happens, my body finds ways to tell me it’s not all right. I’ll get canker sores, heart palpitations, trouble sleeping, etc.

My body knows when the stress is all too much. And when it can’t take anymore, I cry.

And it’s a good cry. A cleansing, whole body cry. Messy and wet. And while it’s not pretty, after it’s over, I always feel so much better.

Your emotions need a release. If you bottle them up, like a pot of water with too tight of a lid, they’ll just come boiling over the top. You need some way to let them go. To relieve your stress and anxiety.

Sometimes you just need to cry.

Sensitivity Shows Empathy

My sensitivity is actually an asset. I am highly attuned to those around me, and I consider myself a very empathetic person.

This is why I cry at movies. Even though a character might be fictional, I can feel their sorrow or pain or happiness.

When you have empathy, you can more easily relate to others. You are more compassionate and kind, and we all know our world could do with more of that. If we’re too focused on ourselves, too selfish, we miss out on the chance for true connection with other humans.

Written by

Copywriter. Blogger. Wife. Bibliophile. Romcom Lover. Tea Addict. Grammar Nerd. Email me: maria.elharaoui@gmail.com

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